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Jesce Horton returns and gives us an update on his new venture Saints cannabis as well as the latest on the MCBA. We go back to episode 78 to get some personal history and then Jesce and I find ourselves in Bryant Park in NYC having a straightforward conversation about race. We discuss the concept of “other” and what’s presented to all of us through the mass media. As we learn that cannabis is so much more than we initially conceived, we discover the fact that the cannabis industry by way of being marginalized by prohibition has the opportunity to lead the way regarding ratcheting down the concept of other by discovering similarities. An MCBA Spotlight episode.

Transcript:

Speaker 2: Jesse Horton returns, Jesse Orton returns and gives us an update on his new venture st cannabis as well as the latest on the minority cannabis business association. We go back to episode 78 to get some personal history and then Jesse and I find ourselves in Bryant Park in New York City having a straightforward conversation about race. We discussed the concept of other and what's presented to all of us in media as we learned that cannabis is so much more than we initially conceived, we discovered the fact that the cannabis industry, by way of being marginalized by prohibition, has the opportunity to lead the way regarding ratcheting down the concept of other by discovery of similarities. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the handle can economy. That's two ends of the word economy. Here's a real conversation with Jesse Horton.

Speaker 1: All right, so let's just track the path to you becoming an Oregonian because if you're maybe not born and bred, but you definitely are now, uh, where were you born and bred? Where'd uh, where'd you grow up? Where were you born? Yeah, the

Speaker 3: path of where I've been sat there will be a very windy road. I started off, I started off in Charlottesville, Virginia, then headed over to Richmond, then to Manassas, Virginia. Um, ended up going down to Columbia, South Carolina and Raleigh, North Carolina, Jacksonville, Florida, Lakeland, Florida, Tallahassee, Florida, Houston, Texas, Baltimore, Maryland, Washington DC. Um, Munich, Germany. Uh, and then Atlanta, Georgia. Also, I can't forget about Atlanta and then found my way out here to Portland to home finally.

Speaker 1: Okay. That is quite a path my friend. So, uh, Virginia I guess in all of those cities. How long were you in Virginia for?

Speaker 3: I was in Virginia for about eight years. Um, I don't, I probably have never lived in one city for longer than three on until I actually got here to Portland.

Speaker 1: Okay. Alright. So Virginia and then Manassas, you bring up and of course stephen stills had a band called Vanessa state did one album and if you haven't heard it, uh, maybe you should or maybe you shouldn't, you know. But uh, so Virginia was just the first eight years. Okay. Find a South Carolina. How long was that? The state,

Speaker 3: South Carolina. Columbia, South Carolina. I was there for about three years as well. And this was all throughout my youth.

Speaker 4: Uh Huh.

Speaker 1: And so then now you're about 11 when you get to Florida. Right. And how long were you there?

Speaker 3: Yeah, that's right. I was, um, in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, all the way up until college. So I'm moved around the middle school and then high school I found myself in Lakeland, Florida for a few years and then made my way up to Tallahassee to go to college.

Speaker 1: Alright. So Florida, I mean, as far as you're concerned, I would imagine that's the thing that you remember most from, from childhood. That's where you spent your formative years, if you will. Is that about right?

Speaker 3: Yeah, I think so. I'm probably most familiar with, uh, with Florida without a doubt.

Speaker 1: All right. So, um, what, why were we moving around so much here? Uh, what, uh, what were your folks doing for, for work at the time?

Speaker 3: Yeah. Well, um, a lot of people ask me if it was miller, if I was a military brat, but I actually was more of a corporate brat. My Dad took a position with his company. I started off at a very, very low position and ended up, um, as a vice president. So have, you could imagine kind of what it took in those years. You have to take every position that you can in order to get up. Uh, we, we spent a lot of time on the road and I think it was a, it was a good thing.

Speaker 1: Yeah. I, you, you know, the, the way that you present a business, we've spoken in the past, um, you know, you, you are truly a corporate brat. That's the first time I've heard, uh, I've heard that phrase, but a arena rather than military broad corporate brat. What, what did your dad kind of ascending, um, you know, through those levels and ultimately becoming a VP? What kind of, uh, you know, um, thought process or mindset did he instill in you a based on that trajectory?

Speaker 3: That's a good question. I think um, I learned a lot from him I think would probably the main thing that I learned from my dad was just looking at the bright side of things, always being an example of what you want to see. I'm never complaining, um, you know, or at least complaining as little as possible and doing it to yourself and in a quiet room if at all possible and just out really showing what is good. I think there's so many positive things about what's going on there. It's not really hard to do that.

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