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Steve DeAngelo, Harborside & Amy O’Gorman Jenkins, Legislative Advocate

Steve DeAngelo returns to hammer home the fact that there is one issue and one issue alone on which the American people agree: cannabis reform. And to that end, in a true master class on activism, Steve shares how exactly to express your concerns on cannabis reform to your local elected officials – and loved ones for that matter. Steve also takes some time to share some history which we very much appreciate. But Amy first shares that as a lobbyist, you don’t need to be a posterior. She shares her background in the state legislature of California as well as the league of California cities where she experienced that a lot of work does, in fact, get done at the local and state level, but that most people don’t understand that introducing or changing policy is all very incremental.

Transcript:

Speaker 1: Steve de Angelo and Emile Gorman Jenkins, amy shares that as a lobbyist, you don't need to be a posterior. She shares her background in the state legislature of California as well as the League of California cities where she experienced that a lot of work does in fact get done at the local and state level, but that most people don't understand that introducing or changing policies, all very incremental. Steve de Angelo then returns to hammer home the fact that there's one issue and one issue alone on which the American people agree, cannabis reform. And to that end in a true masterclass on activism, Steve Shares how exactly to express your concerns on cannabis reform to your local elected officials and loved ones for that matter. Steve also takes some time to share some history, which we very much appreciate. Welcome to cannabis economy. I'm your host Seth Adler. Check us out on social with the American economy to ends in the word economy. Amy O'gorman, Jenkinson Steve de Angelo,

Speaker 2: so are most lobbyists. Kind of a louder or more quiet now. It it. It really, it really, it's, it's just an issue of personal taste. And I, I tend to have a softer approach. I think it's more effective at builds goodwill. Um, you know, you don't need to go in guns blazing when you want to get something done, you want to go in and respect to, you're talking to and who you're working with. And once you establish that rapport, you know, you don't need to be an asshole, you don't need to be. No, you don't need to be an asshole. No, you don't even need to be aggressive, you don't even really need to be aggressive provided that you have the trust in the goodwill and, you know, frankly, I think, I think I have it right. Dig In for two years and I love it.

Speaker 2: So you've been doing lobbying for two years and I've registered lobbyist for two years. And before that though, I mean you were in the, uh, the, the, the, the mechanics of local and state law, state a government which is live with those of the lawmakers. Right. What's it like in there? Well, it depends. I went in, I actually started in the state legislature. I left the state legislature, went out and started working for the League of California cities. Well, let's before we get to the California cities, but it depends what I first learning lesson is that the legislature was the end all be all. That was a step down. Local government representatives have just as big egos a state legislator and you have to approach them all the same, the same sort of tender love and care. And so how, let's just do a approach. The, uh, the legislator, whoever it is, no matter what level.

Speaker 2: So you know, is this person like an artist? Is this person like a, like a CEO? What kind of person? This is a person onto himself. This is a whole new animal I would imagine. Right? So what, what kind of person usually are you dealing with? Understanding that were brought brushing with a broad brush painting with a broad brush painting with a very broad brush, but I think you have to assume all of them have a very healthy ego. Healthy. He's very, very healthy ego. What makes every legislator unique is that despite that healthy ego, they all come in with very, very different perspectives. So the thing I always advise anybody is know your audience before you walk in the door because the last thing you want to do is speak out of turn or express an opinion on an issue that's contrary to theirs.

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